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Prairie Immigration Experience
THE UKRAINIAN CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL CENTRE ARCHIVES:

A PRELIMINARY LIST OF THE HOLDINGS*

Profile

The Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre of Winnipeg, known as Oseredok, is a not for profit, community-based organization founded in Winnipeg in 1944 for the express purpose of collecting, preserving and making available the cultural heritage of Ukrainians in Canada. The Centre maintains and operates an Archives, an Art Gallery, a Library, Museum and an Education/Extension Programme that serves the public school system, the Ukrainian community and the general population of Manitoba. The largest collecting repository of its kind in Canada, Oseredok continues to strive to maintain its founding principles.

The manuscript holdings of the Archives can be divided into the papers of individuals and the records of organizations. The papers of individuals, about two hundred linear metres, reflect the activities of Ukrainian Canadian community leaders such as: Iwan Boberskyj, Dmytro Elcheshen, Toma Kobzey, Oleksandr Koshetz, Pavlo Macenko, Jakiv Maydanyk,T.K. Pavlychenko, Michailo Seleshko, as well as numerous others. The records of associations, about three hundred linear metres, reflect events over the course of history, during the last hundred years in particular, in both Ukraine and Canada, with about eighty per cent of the material relating more pertinently to Ukrainians in Canada. Among the holdings are the records of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, St. Raphael’s Ukrainian Immigrants’ Welfare Association of Canada, the Ukrainian Canadian Relief Fund, the Ukrainian Professional and Business Federation of Canada, the Ukrainian Women’s Organization of Canada, and others, providing research information on immigration to Canada, development of an organized Ukrainian Canadian community between and after the world wars, and various themes in the areas of culture, history, music, religion and politics.

Manuscripts: A Select Sample of the Holdings

N.B. Access by appointment only

1. Alpha Omega Women’s Alumnae (Winnipeg) fonds. 1958-1995.

An alumnae organization established in 1958 by graduates of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg to promote Ukrainian culture and assist promising students of Ukrainian descent.

1.3 m of textual records. Written consent of donor required.

2. Vasile Avramenko fonds. 1930-1981.

Vasile Avramenko (1895-1981) was the pre-eminent Ukrainian folk dance instructor and motion picture producer of the 1920s and 1930s in North America. The fonds consists of duplicates, primarily concert programs, leaflets and printed matter, deleted from the National Archives of Canada (NAC) in Ottawa. See Also: the Vasile Avramenko Collection (MG 31, D 87) at the National Archives of Canada in Ottawa.

2.4 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

3. Volodymyr Barabash fonds. 1944-1989 [?]

Volodymyr Barabash (1900-1989) was a Ukrainian-Canadian pioneer and the author of over 200 poems and 500 aphorisms, some of which were published in Ukrainian- and English-language newspapers.

26 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

4. Iwan Boberskyj [Ivan Bobersky] fonds. 1914-1938.

Iwan Boberskyj (1873-1947), a teacher, physical fitness enthusiast and amateur photographer, was sent to Canada in 1920 by the government-in-exile of the Western Ukrainian National Republic to act as its plenipotentiary. When that government ceased to exist, Bobersky found employment as head of the Ukrainian department at Cunard Lines and was involved in various organizations established to aid Ukrainian immigrants until he left Canada for Yugoslavia in 1932.

1.45 m of textual records (1918-38). 495 glass lantern plates (1914-25). 6,191 b&w photo negatives and positives (1920-32). Open access.

5. Anton Borys fonds. 1981-1995.

Anton Borys (1955- ) emigrated from Ukraine in 1977 and has been employed by several Ukrainian-language newspapers in Winnipeg, including the Ukrainian Catholic weekly Postup, (Progress), in various capacities including that of photographer.

5,407 b&w and colour negatives (1981-95). 3,100 b&w and colour positives (1981-95). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

6. Mykhailo Borysyk fonds. 1900-1945 [?]

Mykhailo Borysyk (1900-1982) was a pioneer Ukrainian evening school teacher and church choir conductor.

52 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

7. Stefania Bubniuk fonds. 1920-1995.

Stefania Bubniuk (1901-1996) was a teacher who emigrated from Western Ukraine in 1926, became a founding member of the Ukrainian Women’s Organization of Canada in 1930 and editor of its official organ Zhinochyi svit (Women’s World) from 1951 to 1973.

68 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

8. Central Ukrainian Relief Bureau (London, UK) fonds. 1945-1950.

Created on the initiative of the Ukrainian Canadian Servicemen’s Association and supported by the Ukrainian Canadian Committee, the Bureau tried to assist Ukrainian refugees in Western Europe. It provided material aid, campaigned against forced repatriation to the USSR and worked for the re-settlement of Ukrainian Displaced Persons in Canada and the USA.

2.08 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

9. Charles Photo Studio fonds and photo collection. 1938-1987.

A commercial photography studio owned and operated in Winnipeg’s North End by Charles Krasnopera.

ca. 37,900 b&w negatives. ca. 10,000 colour negatives and prints (1970-87). Open access, copyright restrictions. Unprocessed fonds, collection.

10. Halia Charney fonds. 1923-1971.

Halia Charney (1908-1995), a teacher active in various professional and women’s organizations, served as co-editor of the Teachers’ Page of the Ukrainian Canadian Review (1939-45) and as editor of the English section of Zhinochyi svit (Women’s World) (1951-1977).

1.43 m of textual records. 200 b&w photographs (1915-1990). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

11. Ewhen Chraplywyj [Evhen Khraplyvyi] fonds. 1915-1949.

Ewhen Chraplywyj (1898-1949) was an engineer and journalist active in the Ukrainian cooperative movement in Western Ukraine during the 1920s and 1930s.

91 cm of textual records. 108 b&w photographs. Written consent of donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

12. Demetrius M. Elcheshen [Dmytro M. Ilchyshyn] fonds. 1899-1983.

D.M. Elcheshen (1902-1983) was an agronomist active in various Ukrainian immigrant aid societies and the Ukrainian (monarchist) movement that supported the claims of Hetman Pavlo Skoropadsky. He was also a founder of the Ukrainian Conservative Club, an active member of the Conservative Party of Canada, an unsuccessful Conservative candidate in the 1932 Manitoba Provincial Elections, a founder of the North Winnipeg Taxpayers’ Association, and a member of Winnipeg City Council in 1937-38.

8.7 m of textual records. Open access.

13. William (Wasyl) Ewaskiw fonds. 1923-1977.

William Ewaskiw (1909- [?]) was involved in the formation of the Canadian Ukrainian Athletic Club (CUAC) in Winnipeg in 1925 and he was a prominent member of the city’s Canadian Ukrainian Institute Prosvita.

13 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

14. “Faces” Ukrainian Program fonds. 1986-1987.

A series of interviews, produced by Bohdana Bashuk, led by Peter Klassen, consisted of live interviews with prominent members of Winnipeg’s Ukrainian community and aired on the city’s multilingual radio station CKJS 810.

51 reel to reel audio-tapes. Open access.

15. Myron Fedoriv fonds. 1947-1993.

Myron Fedoriv (1907- [?]), a musicologist educated in Warsaw and Vienna, taught and conducted choirs at various Ukrainian-American institutions in Stamford, Philadelphia, Chicago and Denver from 1950 to 1990.

78 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

16. Michael Hethman fonds. 1915-1937 [?]

Michael Hethman (1893-1981), a veteran of the Ukrainian Sich Riflemen who immigrated to Canada during the 1920s, was Commander-in-Chief of the (monarchist) United Hetman Organization that supported the claims of Hetman Pavlo Skoropadsky during the 1930s.

17 cm of textual records. Open access.

17. Michael Holowaty fonds. 1912-1991.

Michael Holowaty (1912-1991) was a Ukrainian dance instructor and band conductor in Winnipeg during the 1930s and a member of the Winnipeg Grenadiers during the Second World War.

13 cm of textual records. 164 b&w still images (1913-1991). Phonograph records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

18. Stephen Horbachewsky fonds. 1959-1977.

Stephen Horbachewsky (1892-1984) immigrated to Canada in 1914 and was active in various Ukrainian Catholic amateur theatre groups in Winnipeg.

17 cm of textual records. Open access.

19. Taras Hubicki fonds. 1920-1974.

Taras Hubicki (1908-1974) was an award-winning violinist who performed on Winnipeg radio stations CNRW and CKY, served as concert master of the Winnipeg Choral Orchestral Society, performed with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and was conductor of the Canadian Ukrainian Institute Prosvita chorus during the 1920s and 1930s. In 1937 he moved to Detroit where he joined the faculty of the Detroit Conservatory of Music and was a violinist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

52 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

20. Dokia Humenna fonds. 1928-1951.

Dokia Humenna (1904-1996), a novelist, short story writer and poet, was educated in Kyiv, fled to Lviv during the Second World War and emigrated to New York after the war. The fonds consists of draft typescript copies of several literary works written prior to 1949. See Also: the Dokia Humenna Papers at the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota.

26 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

21. Semen Izyk fonds. 1960-1995.

The Right Reverend Mitrat Semen Izyk (1913-1995) was a Ukrainian Catholic priest, community activist, author and journalist who immigrated to Canada in 1947 and produced the “Voice of Ukraine” radio program on radio station CFRY, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, and a Ukrainian television program on Winnipeg’s public access Videon channel.

213 one hour television broadcast tapes (1981-1995). 76 reel to reel audio tapes (1960-?). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

22. Steve Juba fonds. 1920-1977.

Steve Juba (1914-1993) represented Logan constituency in the Manitoba Legislative Assembly (1953-56) and was Mayor of the City of Winnipeg (1956-77). The fonds consists mainly of newspaper clippings from the Winnipeg Free Press and the Winnipeg Tribune detailing Juba’s career as mayor.

1.2 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

23. Robert Bohdan Klymasz fonds. 1975-1985.

Robert Klymasz (1936- ), a leading authority on Ukrainian-Canadian folklore and ethnography, received his PhD from Indiana University, taught at universities in Canada and the USA, served as executive director of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre (1976-78), and was Curator of the East European Program at the Canadian Centre for Folk Culture Studies, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Hull-Ottawa.

1.16 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

24. Walter (Wolodymyr) Klymkiw fonds. 1955-1998.

Walter Klymkiw (1926-2000) was an educator, businessman, community activist, member of the Board of Directors of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre, choral arranger and conductor of Winnipeg’s Oleksandr Koshetz Choir (1951-98). See Also: the Klymkiw Family fonds (Mss 146, PC 152, TC 98 - A. 01-48) at the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, Winnipeg.

2.98 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

25. Olena Kobzey fonds. 1932-1984.

Olena Kobzey (1896-1987) immigrated to Canada in 1912. She was an active member of the Ukrainian Labour-Farmer Temple Association (ULFTA) in Saskatoon until 1935, and of the Ukrainian Reading Association Prosvita in Winnipeg from 1936 until her death.

13 cm of textual records. Open access.

26. Tomas Kobzey fonds. 1855, 1914-1972.

Tomas Kobzey (1895-1972) immigrated to Canada in 1911, was active in the pro-Soviet Ukrainian Labour-Farmer Temple Association (ULFTA) (1919-35), and was a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of Canada. In 1935, in response to the artificial famine and terror in Soviet Ukraine, he left the ULFTA and the Communist Party, and helped establish the League of Ukrainian Organizations/Ukrainian Workers’ League. He was a founding member of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (1940), contributed to various Ukrainian-language newspapers, and wrote a monograph on Vasyl Stefanyk, and his own memoirs.

2.73 m of textual records. Open access.

27. Evhen Konovaletz fonds. 1932-1940.

Colonel Evhen Konovaletz (1891-1938) was leader of the underground Ukrainian Military Organization (UVO) and the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) in Europe. He was assassinated by a Soviet agent in Rotterdam in 1938. The fonds consists primarily of personal effects, books, printed materials, and several items of correspondence.

1.04 m of textual records. 16 b&w photographs (1937-40). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

28. Semen Korban fonds. 1928-1973 [?]

Semen Korban (1900-1981?), a member of the Ukrainian War Veterans’ Association and the Ukrainian National Federation, was a businessman and community activist in Montreal and Windsor.

? cm of textual records. 122 b&w still images. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

29. Oleksandr (Alexander) Koshetz fonds. 1799, 1846, 1869-1944.

Oleksandr Koshetz (1875-1944), one of the pre-eminent Ukrainian choral conductors, arrangers, composers, and ethnographers, was the leading popularizer of Ukrainian folk songs and liturgical music. Graduating from the Kyiv Theological Academy and the Mykola Lysenko School of Music and Drama, he taught choral music at Kyiv’s Imperial Conservatory of Music, conducted the Sadovsky Theatre orchestra, and served as the conductor and choirmaster of the Kyiv Opera prior to 1917. Between 1919 and 1924, and again in 1926-7, he led the Ukrainian Republican Capella (Ukrainian National Chorus) on very successful concert tours of Europe and the Americas. A resident of New York City from 1922, Koshetz and his chorus visited Toronto and Winnipeg in 1923 and 1926. From 1941 until 1944, Koshetz spent the summer months in Winnipeg teaching choral music and choir conducting at courses sponsored by the Ukrainian National Federation. He died in Winnipeg on September 21, 1944.

7.41 m of textual records. 963 b&w prints and 542 b&w negatives (1900-1944). Open access.

30. Tetiana Koshetz fonds. 1900 [?]-1966.

Tetiana Koshetz (1892-1966) was educated in Vinnytsia and Kyiv, and sang in several choirs directed by Oleksandr Koshetz prior to their marriage in 1917. She was a vocalist with the Ukrainian Republican Capella (Ukrainian National Chorus), a voice teacher, and after 1944 museum curator and administrator of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre in Winnipeg.

3.77 m of textual records. Open access.

31. Wolodymyr [Wladimir] Kossar fonds. 1943-1955.

Wolodymyr Kossar (1890-1970), a plant ecologist, immigrated to Canada in 1927 and was a founding member of the Ukrainian War Veterans’ Association (1928) and the Ukrainian National Federation (1932), whose national executive he headed (1937-53). He was also a founding member of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (1940) and the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre in Winnipeg (1944). The fonds consists primarily of printed and promotional materials. See Also: the Wladimir Kossar Collection (MG 30, D 277) at the National Archives of Canada, Ottawa.

39 cm of textual records. Open access.

32. Peter Kuch fonds. 1924-1980.

Peter Kuch (1917-1980) worked for the Winnipeg Free Press and served as its editorial cartoonist from 1952 until 1980. The fonds consists of original sketch books, duplicate newspaper clippings, examples of books illustrated by Kuch, illustrations in trade magazines, and miscellaneous clippings, leaflets and letters. See Also: Kuch’s original editorial cartoons in the Winnipeg Free Press collection at the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Winnipeg.

78 cm of textual records. 38 b&w and 35 colour still images (1924-80). Open access.

33. Michael Lazechko fonds. 1917-ca. 1950 [ ?]

Michael Lazechko (1891-1952) immigrated to Canada in 1912 and became a pharmacist in 1922.

13 cm of textual materials. Open access.

34. Nicholas P. Lewchuk fonds. 1920 [?]-1990.

Nicholas Lewchuk (1896-1990) was proprietor of Lewchuk’s Vaudeville and Midway, a family enterprise that performed in western Canada from 1918 to the 1940s. He also owned a seed house, plant nursery and orchard.

13 twenty-minute video tapes (1987). 10 audio tapes (1987). 3 reels of 16 mm film (1955-60). 200 posters (1930-1980). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

35. Danylo Lobay fonds. 1920-1948.

Danylo Lobay (1893-1966) immigrated to Canada in 1913, worked as co-editor of socialist and communist newspapers in Winnipeg, and was active in the Ukrainian Labour-Farmer Temple Association and the Communist Party of Canada. In 1935, as a result of the artificial famine and terror in Soviet Ukraine, he left the ULFTA and the Communist Party, helped establish the League of Ukrainian Organizations/Ukrainian Workers’ League, and edited its newspapers Pravda (The Truth) and Vpered (Forward) (1936-40). He was also a founding member of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (1940), co-editor of Ukrainskyi holos (Ukrainian Voice) (1948-65) and author of several monographs.

10 cm of textual records (1926-48). 34 b&w still images (1920-48). Open access.

36. Paul Macenko (Pavlo Matsenko) fonds. 1901-1984.

Paul Macenko (1897-1991) was a musicologist, composer and author who completed his doctoral studies in Prague. He emigrated to Canada in 1936 and worked as a choir conductor and music teacher. He served as cultural and educational director of the Ukrainian National Federation and secretary of the Board of Directors of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre.

8.9 m of textual records. 246 b&w and 30 colour prints (1914-83). Written consent of donor required.

37. Mykyta Mandryka fonds. 1875-1978 [ ?]

Mykyta Mandryka (1886-1979) was a member of the Central Rada in Kyiv (1917-18), served in the diplomatic corps of the Ukrainian National Republic, and wrote and lectured on international law at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague (1927-28). A member of the Ukrainian Party of Socialist Revolutionaries, he emigrated to Canada in 1928, edited Pravda i volia (Truth and Freedom) in Winnipeg (1928-29), worked as a notary public, participated in the founding of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (1940), published several volumes of poetry, wrote about Ukrainian literature in Canada, and served as president of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in Canada (1970-73). See Also: the Mykyta Mandryka Collection (MG 30, D 238) at the National Archives of Canada, Ottawa.

1.04 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

38. Manitoba Parents for Ukrainian Education, Inc. fonds. 1978-1995.

An organization founded in 1979 to assist parent committees, teachers and school board administrators involved in the Ukrainian-English bilingual program.

19.24 m of textual records. Written permission of donor required.

39. Wolodymyr (Walter) Martynets fonds. 1949-1951.

Wolodymyr Martynets (1899-1960), a journalist, author and editor, was a founding member of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) in 1929. He emigrated to Canada in 1949 and was a co-editor of Novyi shliakh (New Pathway) in Winnipeg.

26 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

40. Michael Marunchak fonds. 1920-1997.

Michael Marunchak (1914- ) studied law in Lviv and Prague (1936-41) and Social Work in Winnipeg, where he worked as a child guidance counselor (1957-79). Active in numerous Ukrainian organizations in the city, he authored some twenty books, primarily on the history of Ukrainians in Canada.

43.5 m of textual records. Written permission of donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

41. Andrij Mudryk fonds. 1933-1966.

Andrij Mudryk (1893-1969) was active in the cooperative movement in Western Ukraine (1924-44) as an instructor, director and journalist, before immigrating to Canada in 1951.

92 cm of textual fonds. Open access. Processed fonds.

42. New Pathway (Novyi shliakh) Publishers Ltd. fonds. 1930-1975.

Weekly newspaper founded in Edmonton in October, 1930. Subsequently published in Saskatoon (1933-42), Winnipeg (1942-75), and Toronto (1975- ) it has been the official organ of the Ukrainian National Federation since 1932. It supported the positions of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) from its inception, and the views of the OUN’s Melnyk faction from the 1940s.

32.24 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

43. Omelian Nizankiwsky fonds. 1930-1972 [?]

Omelian Nizankiwsky (1895-1972?) was a pianist, composer, and pedagogue, educated in Switzerland where he earned a doctorate in musicology.

33 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

44. Evhen Onatsky fonds. 1919-1947.

Evhen Onatsky (1894-1979) was a member of the Central Rada in Kyiv (1917-18) and director of the press bureau of the Ukrainian National Republic’s diplomatic mission in Rome. During the interwar years he was a journalist and the Italian representative of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) (1929-43). He immigrated to Argentina in 1947 where he was active in the Ukrainian community. See Also: the Evhen Onatsky Papers at the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota.

39 cm of textual records. Open access.

45. Gordon Richard Bohdan Panchuk fonds. 1915-1987.

G.B.R. Panchuk (1915-1987) joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1940, posted overseas in 1941. During the war he was instrumental in the formation of the Ukrainian Canadian Servicemen’s Association (president 1943-45) and the Central Ukrainian Relief Bureau (director 1946-48) that tried to assist Ukrainian refugees in Europe. After the war he worked in the Ukrainian language section of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s foreign service (1952-55) and as a high school teacher in Montreal (1955-80). See Also: the G.B.R. Panchuk Collection at the Archives of Ontario, Toronto, and the G.B.R. Panchuk Collection (MG 31, D 118) at the National Archives of Canada, Ottawa.

16.64 m of textual records. 212 audiotapes (1966-67). 57 reels of 16 mm film (ca. 1937-49). Written permission of donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

46. Tymish Pavlychenko fonds. 1927-1957.

T.K. Pavlychenko (1892-1958), a member of the Central Rada in Kyiv (1917-18), and a plant ecologist who earned a PhD at the University of Nebraska, he taught at the University of Saskatchewan (1938-48). Pavlychenko immigrated to Canada in 1927, and was active in the Ukrainian National Federation and the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre.

65 cm of textual records. Open access.

47. Cornelius Sofron Prodan fonds. 1904-1965.

Cornelius (Kornylo) Prodan (1888-1973) immigrated to Canada in 1907 and became a provincial agronomist after graduating from the University of Manitoba. He was one of the founders of the St. Raphael’s Ukrainian Immigrants’ Welfare Association of Canada in 1925. See Also: the Cornelius Prodan Papers in the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences of Canada Archive, Winnipeg.

10 cm of textual records. Open access.

48. Providence Church Goods Ltd. fonds. 1921-1980.

A commercial church goods supply business owned and operated by artist and humorist Jacob Maydanyk (1891-1981) at various locations in North Winnipeg (1914-79).

2.47 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

49. Slaw Rebchuk fonds. 1930-1996.

Slaw Rebchuk (1907-1996) was an alderman representing Ward 3 and Norquay Ward on Winnipeg City Council (1950-78), including two terms as Deputy Mayor. A life long member of the Canadian Ukrainian Athletic Club (CUAC) and St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic parish, he was also active in the Ukrainian Catholic Brotherhood and the Knights of Columbus.

1.27 m of textual records. 785 b&w and colour still images (1914-95). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

50. St. Raphael’s Ukrainian Immigrants’ Welfare Association of Canada fonds. 1917, 1924-1938.

A benevolent society established in Winnipeg by prominent Ukrainian Catholics in response to the Canadian government’s policy of encouraging immigration from central and eastern Europe (1925-30). The society’s activities declined after 1929 as a result of the Depression and new government restrictions on immigration to Canada, folding in 1938.

2.9 m of textual records. Open access.

51. Mychajlo [Mykhailo] Seleshko fonds. 1926-1978.

Mychajlo Seleshko (1900-1981) was a member of the Ukrainian Military Organization (UVO) and a founding member of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN). He worked for the Ukrainian Press Service in Berlin, acted as secretary to Colonel Evhen Konovalets, and served as general secretary of the Ukrainian National Federation in Germany (1939-41). Immigrating to Canada in 1948, he was active in the Ukrainian War Veterans’ Association (UWVA) and the Ukrainian National Federation. In addition to Seleshko’s personal papers, the fonds contains the papers of the UWVA national executive (1929-1978).

7.41 m of textual records. Open access.

52. Cecil (Jaroslav) Semchyshyn fonds. 1930-1994.

Cecil Semchyshyn (1930-2002) was a pharmacist; a singer, radio, television and theatre actor; founder, director and producer of the Ukrainian Theatre in Winnipeg (1962-77); a founding father of Winnipeg’s annual Folklorama Festival; an employee of the Manitoba Department of Tourism, Recreation and Cultural Affairs; and Director of the Secretariat on Federal-Provincial Cultural Relations. He was active in various Ukrainian organizations and served on the Board of Directors of numerous Winnipeg arts organizations.

1.3 m of textual records. 44 b&w and 72 colour negatives. 750 b&w and 253 colour prints. 22 audio and 2 audio-visual tapes (1966-84). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

53. Wasyl Shut fonds. 1919-1928.

Wasyl Shut (1899-1982), graduating from the Mykola Lysenko School of Music and Drama in Kyiv, worked in theatres in Kyiv and the Donbas region during the 1930s. He settled in Chicago in 1950. See Also: the Wasyl Shut Papers at the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota.

13 cm of textual materials. Open access. Processed fonds.

54. Osyp Siecinskyj fonds. 1930-1965.

Osyp Siecinskyj (1888-1965) was a war veteran, metallurgical engineer and editor. He immigrated to Canada in 1948, organized the Society of Ukrainian Engineers in Toronto, and was active in the Shevchenko Scientific Society of Canada.

59 cm of textual records. 17 b&w still images (1952). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

55. Dmytro Solovey fonds. 1917, 1946-1949.

Dmytro Solovey (1888-1966) was a statistician, pedagogue, publicist and historian. He was educated in Kharkiv, moved to Lviv in 1943 and settled in the United States after the Second World War, producing several books on the history and political system of Soviet Ukraine. He was a member of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the USA.

39 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

56. Lev Sorochynsky fonds. 1875-1971.

Lev Sorochynsky (1895-1963), a member of Oleksandr Koshetz’s Ukrainian National Chorus, was a choir conductor and arranger in various Ukrainian communities in the United States.

4.3 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

57. John [Ivan] Sosnovey fonds. 1947-1965.

John Sosnovey (1921-1973) settled in Canada in 1948. Employed by several Ukrainian newspapers in Winnipeg, he was an active member of the Ukrainian National Federation and the Oleksandr Koshetz Choir.

26 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

58. “Steppe to Prairie” Television Program fonds. 1974-1975.

“Steppe to Prairie”, an English-language community access television program on the arts and culture, aired in 1974-75 in Winnipeg on Videon Cable Channel 13.

17 broadcast tapes totaling 10-12 hours. Open access.

59. Mykola Streshak fonds. 1985 [?]-1995.

Mykola Streshak (1922-1995), an amateur photographer and videographer who immigrated to Canada in 1948, held a variety of jobs in Winnipeg, including proprietor of a watch repair business. He was an active member of the Canadian Ukrainian Institute Prosvita and the St. Mary the Protectress Ukrainian Orthodox congregation.

772 VHS videotapes. Up to 10,000 35 mm colour negatives and prints.

60. T. Shevchenko Ukrainian Museum (Blomberg, Germany) fonds. 1945-1950.

The museum was established in a Displaced Persons camp in the British zone of Germany.

11.05 m of textual records. Open access.

61. Eugene [Evhen] Turula fonds. 1886-1940.

Eugene Turula (1882-1951) was a Ukrainian Catholic priest (until 1925), composer, music teacher and choir conductor. Educated in Lviv, he worked with Ukrainian prisoners-of-war (1914-1917), and taught music in Berlin until he immigrated to Canada in 1923. During the 1920s and 1930s he was choir conductor of several Ukrainian organizations in Winnipeg, staged numerous operettas, offered private lessons and composed original works for violin, piano and chorus, publishing several collections.

2.8 m of textual records. Open access. Processed fonds.

62. Mykola Uhryn-Bezhrishnyj fonds. ? -?

Mykola Uhryn Bezhrishnyj (1883-1960) was a pedagogue, publicist, journalist and author.

? cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

63. Ukrainian Association of Victims of Russian Communist Terror (Winnipeg Branch) fonds. 1953-1979.

Established in 1950 in Toronto by Semen Pidhainy (1907-65), who spent time in a Soviet forced labour camp (1933-41), the association consisted of survivors of Soviet repression who were dedicated to publicizing the misdeeds of the Soviet regime by means of publications, commemorative concerts, meetings and public demonstrations.

33 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

64. Ukrainian Canadian Congress Headquarters fonds. 1940-1983.

The UCC was founded in Winnipeg in 1940 as a national umbrella organization to coordinate the activities of non-Communist Ukrainian organizations in promoting the domestic war effort during the Second World War. Initially named the Ukrainian Canadian Committee, it was officially renamed the Ukrainian Canadian Congress in 1990. Today it seeks to coordinate the efforts of its member organizations, to further the interests of the Ukrainian Canadian community at large, and to preserve and disseminate Ukrainian Canadian culture. The Congress also acts as the main spokesman for the Ukrainian Canadian Community before the government and people of Canada. See Also: the Ukrainian Canadian Congress Collection at the National Archives of Canada, Ottawa.

111.83 m of textual records. 185 still images. 206 reel to reel audiotapes (1959-1983). Written permission of the donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

65. Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko fonds. 1963-1993.

The foundation, established by the Ukrainian Canadian Committee in 1963 as a Winnipeg-based not for profit endowment fund to promote Ukrainian culture in Canada, was incorporated by an Act of Parliament. Between 1963 and 1998 the Foundation awarded about $2.5 million.

5.83 m of textual records. Written permission of the donor required. Processed fonds.

66. Ukrainian Canadian Relief Fund (Winnipeg) fonds. 1945-1972.

The UCRF was created in 1945 by the Ukrainian Canadian Servicemen’s Association and the Ukrainian Canadian Committee to assist Ukrainian refugees in postwar Europe. Between 1945 and 1947 it raised nearly $200,000. Its Relief Mission worked through the Canadian Red Cross and the International Relief Organization (IRO) in the British Occupation Zone in Germany, first to stop forced repatriation of Ukrainians to the Soviet Union, then to lobby for refugee re-settlement and family re-unification in Canada. In 1962 the UCRF was reconstituted as the Ukrainian Canadian Social Services with a change in mandate to assist long-term resettlement cases.

2.34 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

67. Ukrainian Community Development Committee. 1982-1988.

Established in May 1982 as a sub-committee of the National Executive of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (now Congress), the UCDC served as a Prairie-wide committee with the mandate to provide the National Executive with concrete proposals to meet long-term needs of the Ukrainian community in Canada. The results of its survey of the community were published in a document entitled Building the Future: Ukrainian Canadians in the Twenty-First Century (1986).

4.1 m of textual records. Written permission of the donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

68. Ukrainian Community in Ben Metiri, Tunisia fonds. 1947-1956.

The community consisted of Ukrainians resettled from Displaced Persons camps in France and Germany to work in Tunisian oil fields. It was disbanded in 1956.

13 cm of textual records. 88 b&w still images (1952-54). Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

69. Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre fonds. 1944-1996.

The UCEC was founded in Winnipeg by the Ukrainian National Federation of Canada as a repository for Ukrainian cultural and historical artefacts. The Centre consists of four collecting divisions (museum, art gallery, public library, archive) and an education extension program. Between 1944 and 1962 the UCEC organized annual two month educational summer courses. It has published over 50 titles, and organized numerous exhibits, lectures and workshops.

74.1 m of textual records. Written permission of donor required.

70. Ukrainian Institute of Taras Shewchenko [Shevchenko], Brooklands fonds. 1915-1981.

Founded in 1914 and incorporated in 1916 as the Ukrainian Society of T.H. Shewczenko, the society adopted its present name in 1931. Located in Winnipeg’s West End, the Institute sought to provide lectures, debates, concerts, plays and social events for Ukrainians in the Brooklands district. It maintained a library, a Ukrainian language school, a dance school, a benevolent society, a ladies’ club, an athletic club, and a service club.

1.3 m of textual records. Open access. Processed fonds.

71. Ukrainian Literary Association of Markian Shashkevich fonds. 1925-1989.

The association, located in Winnipeg’s Point Douglas area, traced its origins to a Saturday Ukrainian language school established in 1925. A building was constructed in 1928 and the association maintained a women’s auxiliary, a mutual benefit society, a youth league, a credit union and a cooperative store.

1.17 m of textual records. 16 b&w still images. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

72. Ukrainian Professional and Business Club of Winnipeg fonds. 1943-1994.

Originally named the Ukrainian Professional and Business Men’s Club, it was founded in 1943 by a group of Ukrainian businessmen to provide fellowship, leadership and support for the Ukrainian community at large. The Winnipeg club was instrumental in forming the national federation of Ukrainian business clubs in 1965, now known as the Ukrainian Canadian Professional and Business Federation. Over the years the club has helped initiate, financially support or otherwise promote numerous institutions and projects for the benefit of the Ukrainian community.

3.65 m of textual records. Written consent of the donor required.

73. Ukrainian Professional and Business Federation of Canada fonds. 1970-1985.

The UPBFC (originally known as the Federation of Ukrainian Professional and Businessmen’s Clubs of Canada) was founded by delegates representing twelve clubs at the 1965 Ukrainian Canadian Committee congress. It has played an important role in the creation of educational bodies such as the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) at the Universities of Alberta and Toronto, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto.

1.43 m of textual records. Written permission of the donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

74. Ukrainian Reading Association “Prosvita” fonds. 1913-1983.

Founded in 1903 the association was housed in various locations until it erected its own building at 667 Flora Avenue in Winnipeg’s North End (1921-2001). From the earliest years, the association sponsored a library, drama group, a Saturday and evening Ukrainian language school, a women’s club and a benevolent society. Between 1921 and the 1990s it hosted and participated in numerous significant community events.

1.3 m of textual records. Written permission of the donor required. Unprocessed fonds.

75. Ukrainian Society for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries fonds. 1975-1985 [?]

The Society (1926-1992) was established in Kharkiv, then capital of Soviet Ukraine and was colloquially known as the Ukrainian Society (Tovarystvo Ukraina). Its official role was to develop cultural contacts between Soviet Ukraine and other countries thus serving as a major source of Soviet propaganda. The fonds consists of films that promote the Soviet Ukrainian system.

34 reels of 16 mm film. Open access.

76. Ukrainian Women’s Organization of Canada, National Executive fonds. 1934-1993.

The UWOC, established in Saskatoon in 1934, is an autonomous national women’s organization affiliated with the Ukrainian National Federation of Canada. Between 1934 and 1984 the existence of 64 branches was documented. The national executive published a Newsletter (Obizhnyk) from 1934, contributed a women’s page to Novyi shliakh (New Pathway) the UNF organ until 1950, and launched a monthly magazine Zhinochyi svit (Women’s World) in 1950. The UWOC focused on cultural and educational work, contributed to the Canadian war effort and participated in the formation of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee Women’s Council (1944) and the World Federation of Ukrainian Women’s Organizations (1948). The organization is also a member of the National Council of Women of Canada (1947), Amnesty International and the International Council of Women.

14.79 m of textual records. Written permission of the donor required.

77. United Hetman Organization, Winnipeg Branch fonds / Antin Oleksiuk fonds. 1915-1974.

The UHO, established in 1934, was a Ukrainian monarchist movement dedicated to the restoration of a Ukrainian state under Hetman Pavlo Skoropadsky or his descendants. In Canada, the UHO was preceded by the Canadian Sitch Organization (1924-34). In 1937-38, the Hetman’s son, Danylo Skoropadsky toured Canada and met with UHO members, the Ukrainian Canadian public, and Canadian dignitaries. In 1940 the UHO became one of the founding organizations of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (Congress). The movement declined after the Second World War, weakened by internal divisions and the death of Pavlo and Danylo Skoropadsky. The fonds was donated by the family of Antin Oleksiuk, the last surviving member of the Winnipeg Branch.

1.92 m of textual fonds. Open access. Processed fonds.

78. Vogue Photo Studio fonds. 1951-1971.

In 1921 CNR workers Mike Dubchak and George Pawliuk established a photo studio at 591 Selkirk Avenue in Winnipeg’s North End. In 1928 Pawliuk left and established the Star Photo Studio on Pacific Avenue while Dubchak named the studio on Selkirk Avenue the Paris Art Studio. In the 1940s Dubchak and his son renamed it the Vogue Photo Studio. By 1958 the studio was controlled by Dmytro (Dan) Harapiak. The studio employed a number of photographers and hand-colourists, before closing in 1971.

15,495 b&w still images. Open access.

79. Winnipeg Music Supply Ltd. fonds. 1912-1959.

The store originated as the Ruthenian Booksellers Company in 1906 owned by Frank (Dojacek) Dojack, a Czech immigrant, who also published Ukrainian-, Polish-, German- and Croatian-language newspapers. It sold books, sheet music, musical supplies and instruments, radios, appliances and jewelry. A very active mail order business evolved under the name Book & Music Store, distributing merchandise catalogues in Polish, German and Ukrainian and catering to customers in all parts of Canada and the United States. At their height the Dojacks operated book and music stores in Vancouver, Regina, Edmonton and Winnipeg (where they also owned the Harmony Music Store on Portage Avenue). The Winnipeg Music Supply Ltd operated until 1984. The fonds consists of sample publications sold to the Ukrainian community. See Also: the Winnipeg Musical Supply fonds at the Provincial Archives of Manitoba, Winnipeg.

1.56 m of textual fonds. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

80. Women’s World [Zhinochyi svit] Magazine fonds. 1950-1993.

The magazine was only the second national Ukrainian women’s magazine established in Canada when it was founded in Winnipeg in 1950 as the official organ of the Ukrainian Women’s Organization of Canada (UWOC). It has been published in Winnipeg (1950-73), Toronto (1974-84) and Winnipeg (1985- ).

23.2 m of textual records. Open access.

81. Anthony (Tony) John Yaremovich fonds. 1913-1993.

Anthony Yaremovich (1913-1993), a teacher, lawyer and community activist, he participated in the formation of the Ukrainian Canadian Committee (1940), served with the Royal Canadian Artillery (1943-46) and was active in the Ukrainian Canadian Servicemen’s Association and the Ukrainian Canadian Relief Mission. He was president (1953-57) and executive director (1981-84) of the UCC, and an executive member of the Brotherhood of Ukrainian Catholics (1946-93).

9.1 m of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

82. John Yuzyk fonds. 1955-1972.

John Yuzyk (1913- ) served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War, and was a businessman and community activist.

26 cm of textual records. Open access. Unprocessed fonds.

*This list is based on “A Guide to the Archival Holdings of the Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre, 1996” (updated June 10, 1998) and “The Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre Archives: A Guide to the Holdings,” prepared by Zenon Hluszok, Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre, 1998. It does not include the holdings in the Small Accession Files.


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